Tips for Incorporating Native Advertising into Your Publications

Tips for Incorporating Native Advertising into Your Publications

 

If you’re going to use native ads in your publications, it's very important that you know what you’re getting into and you stay true to the ideas, morals and values that you want to project for your brand. The first thing to understand is the different types of native ads that you can use.

Within Feeds

Usually these ads appear on networks right in the information feed for users, with a label of “sponsored” on it. You can see a lot of these types of ads on Facebook, for example.

Paid Search

This is seen on Google where the paid results appear at the top or right side of the search results, but look a lot like the other results.

Recommended Widgets

You’ll see these on the right or at the bottom or side of other editorial content on CNN if you look. They are often pushed by a platform like Outbrain.com.

Promoted Listings

These are used on platforms like Amazon or YouTube. They usually appear to the right side of other listings that are similar, and state that they are promoted or sponsored.

In-Ad Units

These often appear near content and take users away from the page they are reading. They are considered relevant content.

Customsponsored ads

This might appear on iTunes, YouTube or other accounts that list sponsored content for very specific types of ads.

 

Create a Sponsorship Page

If you want to sell native ads, you’ll need to create a page that lets people know you want to accept sponsorships. You can create the page that allows you to control the user experience and ensure that any ad you accept meets your standards. You’ll want to list a publication calendar so that the businesses know what is coming up. This means that they will know what events, ideas, products, and content is relevant for your audience.

 

Practice Transparency

Ensure that your users know that you accept these types of ads and label them appropriately each time they’re included in your users’ experiences. Whether it’s a giveaway on YouTube, or a product haul, or mentioning specific ingredients for a recipe, let your users know that you’re being paid for that – or else they will grow not to trust you.

 

Say No

Sometimes you’ll get an offer that just doesn’t fit your ideals. It’s okay to say no. Money isn’t everything. For example, if you’ve tried a product and you don’t like it, it’s okay to tell the company that you’ve tried it and you don’t like it. They want to know the truth and will appreciate that. If a company sends you a free product unsolicited, it’s okay to show your audience and give it a bad review even when you got the product free. Say so in the review and be fair.

The important thing is to be sure that the product fits your ideas, morals, and goals for your business. If not, skip it. There is nothing wrong with making money doing what you love, and even for promoting products you will use anyway. But, don’t get carried away with the money and take on promoting things you don’t like and will never use.

Persuasive Writing Techniques You Should Use

Persuasive Writing Techniques You Should Use

One of the most important skills you can learn when trying to improve your copywriting is the art of persuasion. Using persuasion with words is a skill that you can learn if you understand how to do it. Let’s go over some common persuasive writing techniques used by the pros.

  • Ask Rhetorical Questions

    This is a question that you know no one is really going to answer and doesn’t need an answer to get results. Instead, the question is designed to make the reader think about something important. “Do You Want To Triple Your Conversions?” No answer needed; of course you do, and here’s how.

  • Use Repetition

    You don’t have to go all infomercial on your audience, but repetition does help get a thought or idea into their minds. That’s why TV infomercials use the technique; it works. It might be irritating to some of you but it gets results. Using repetition in copywriting doesn’t have to be as caustic. For example, you can use repetition in placement of the buy button, offering several calls to action on one sales page.

  • Add Emotion to Your Words

    Use words that elicit feeling from your audience. You may want them to feel happy, sad, excited and even guilty. Using the words that bring out the emotion you want them to feel can help lead your audience down the path you want them to go. You can draw emotions by telling a story, providing case studies, and examples.

  • Provide a Little Hyperbole

    In advertising it’s legal to “blow smoke” a little bit. Don’t lie, but do exaggerate a bit in order to get your point across. Overstating that your solution is “the best” and “most in-depth” is not a lie, but of course you don’t really know if it’s true or not because you’ve not seen every possible solution.

  • Give Some Stats and Facts

    infographics_10076149-1115-allint-1_LBacking up your points with facts is an important way to get the audience on your side. People like statistics and facts used to back up your points because it helps build trust in your words. Find a way to tone down the stats by making them seem human, using examples that involve a story.

  • Describe It in Triplicate

    This is not about repetition; this is about using three descriptive words (adjectives) to accentuate your points. For example: “These simple, juicy, and flavorful chicken recipes will become family favorites.”

  • Be Personal

    Perhaps your English teacher said not to use personal pronouns in writing, but in copywriting you should definitely use personal pronouns. It’s about your audience, not you, so use “you” a lot in your copywriting. But, if you want to relate to the reader, you can also use “we” and “our” to draw them onto your side.

  • Acquire Alliteration Abilities

    Technically, this isn’t alliteration since normally you are supposed to use consonants and not vowels repetitively to make them sound out. A great example is the store “Bed Bath & Beyond.”

Don’t use every single technique in each page of copy or headline, but do pick out one or two to use in order to create content such as sales pages, advertising copy, and more that converts.